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Reptiles

  • Marbofloxacin is given by mouth and is used on and off label to treat certain bacterial infections including leishmaniasis, tuberculosis, and hemoplasmosis. Common side effects include vomiting, diarrhea, and lack of appetite. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it or other quinolones, or in small and medium breed dogs before 8 months of age, in large breed dogs before 12 months of age, in giant breed dogs before 18 months of age, or in cats before 12 months of age. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Nitenpyram is given by mouth and is used on and off label to treat adult flea infestations and fly larvae infestations. Give as directed by your veterinarian. The most common side effect is itchiness. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it, in pets that weigh less than 2 pounds, or in pets younger than 4 weeks old. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Nystatin is an antifungal, given by mouth in the form of a tablet or liquid suspension, and used off label to treat Candida fungal infections in dogs, cats, birds, and reptiles. Side effects are rare, but at high doses could cause stomach upset or mouth irritation. It should not be used in pets that are allergic to it. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Several species of snakes are commonly kept as pets including king snakes, rat snakes, garter snakes, corn snakes, various pythons, and various boa constrictors. Some snakes, especially the ball python, may not eat for weeks to months after the stress of going to a new home and new environment. Snakes shed their skin every few weeks as they grow. A healthy snake in a healthy environment sheds its old skin in one piece. Young, captive-raised animals make the best pets. Within 48 hours of your purchase, your snake should be examined by a qualified reptile veterinarian. Like all pets, snakes should be examined at least annually, and a fecal examination, looking for parasites, should be part of every examination.

  • The red-eared slider is probably the most popular pet aquatic turtle. If you keep more than one in the same tank, they should have plenty of swimming room and should be of similar size to avoid bullying. The goal is to keep the tank temperature and light cycle constant so that pet turtles do not go into hibernation. Red-eared sliders can be fed a combination of commercially available turtle pellets, small fish, and a variety of vegetables. They should also receive supplemental calcium and a multivitamin. All reptiles can potentially carry Salmonella bacteria in their gastrointestinal tracts and can shed it in their feces. Thoroughly wash your hands after handling your turtle, feeding it, or cleaning its cage. Males are smaller than females. Turtles have a cloaca; feces and urine that accumulates in the cloaca is voided externally to the outside through the vent opening, found on the under surface of the tail. Within 48 hours of your purchase or adoption of a new turtle, your new pet should be examined by a veterinarian familiar with reptiles.

  • Box turtles can make great pets if cared for properly. With proper diet and housing, captive box turtles usually live up to 20 years of age, but some have been reported to live 30-40 years. Most turtles carry Salmonella asymptomatically, in that they do not show signs of illness. Wash your hands thoroughly with disinfectant soap every time after handling, feeding your reptile, or cleaning its cage items to help minimize risks of contracting salmonellosis. Turtles have protective shells that replace many of the bones that other animals have. The shell is covered with bony plates called scutes. Turtles have strong leg and neck muscles that enable them to retract their limbs and head into their shells when they are disturbed or stressed. Turtles have a renal portal blood system. Unlike mammals that excrete urea, box turtles and other reptiles try to conserve water by excreting uric acid. Turtles have a cloaca, which is the common space inside the hind end of the turtle’s body into which the urinary, gastrointestinal, and reproductive systems all empty. Feces and urine that accumulates in the cloaca is voided externally to the outside through the vent opening, found on the under surface of the tail. Within 48 hours of your purchase or adoption of a new turtle, your new pet should be examined by a veterinarian familiar with reptiles. Like all pets, turtles should be examined at least annually and should have their feces tested for parasites at every examination.

  • Ponazuril is given by mouth and is used on and off label to treat protozoal parasites in a variety of animal species. Side effects are uncommon but may include soft stools. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it. Ponazuril should be used cautiously in pregnant or lactating pets, and dogs with/susceptible to dry eye (keratoconjunctivitis sicca/KCS). If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Prednisone/prednisolone is given by mouth or injection and is used on and off label to treat Addison’s disease, inflammatory conditions, neoplasia (cancer), and immune-mediated diseases. Give this medication as directed by your veterinarian. Common side effects include increased drinking, increased urination, and increased appetite. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it, or pets with systemic fungal infections, viral infections, ulcers, tuberculosis, or Cushing’s disease. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Telemedicine is the act of practicing medicine from a distance and your appointment will be conducted by a licensed veterinarian. Before your appointment, gather information on your pet’s history and your current concern. Look at a calendar and write down a timeline of your pet’s problems. Be prepared to answer questions that you would normally be asked at an in-person appointment. Write notes to help you remember everything. Most telemedicine appointments involve the use of some type of video chat. Conduct your visit in a quiet area with good lighting and have your pet with you before the call starts. Not all concerns can be addressed through telemedicine. If your veterinarian is unable to arrive at a diagnosis via telemedicine, he or she can help you determine the next step for your pet to ensure that he or she receives optimal care.

  • Having your pet properly prepared for a blood test helps to ensure that the results are as accurate and reliable as possible. Preparation for these two types of tests is slightly different. Your veterinarian will give you specific instructions before your appointment. It is important that you follow these instructions exactly to ensure accurate test results.